Home    Contact 

  PLANE CRAZY Registered Corgi dealer

 Terms   Search  
 1/144 Civil   1/144 Military   1/72 WW2   1/72 Jet   Other Corgi   Non Corgi 

Corgi aviation archive model details

 
 Back to full list->     Ask question about model->   

Code

Make

Description

Price

35803 Corgi   F-86F Sabre - MiG Poison, 67th FS, Hagerstrom, Korean War £ 34.95
       BUY IT 
     
  F-86F Sabre Diecast Model USAF 18th FBG, 67th FBS, "MiG Poison", James Hagerstrom, Osan, South Korea, 1953. Made of die-cast metal with a wingspan of approx. 6 3/4 inches. From the Corgi Aviation Archive Legends collection with fixed lowered undercarriage in a diorama blister with stand. This wonderful model has an incredible amount of detail. Intended primarily for US only issue, so very few have come to the UK.

When the 18th FBG converted from F-15 Mustangs to the F-86F in late 1952, several experienced pilots from the veteran Sabre-equipped 4th and 51st FIWs were transferred in to help with the jet conversion. One of these was Maj James Hagerstrom, who proceeded to add 6.5 MiG-15 kills to the two he had previously scored with the 4th FIW. He was the 18th FBGs sole Sabre ace. Designed to meet a USAAF requirement for a day-fighter/escort fighter/dive-bomber, the F86 was first flown on October 1st, 1947.

The North American F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was a transonic jet fighter aircraft. Produced by North American Aviation, the Sabre is best known as America's first swept wing fighter which could counter the similarly winged Soviet MiG-15 in high-speed dogfights over the skies of the Korean War. Considered one of the best and most important fighter aircraft in the Korean War, the F-86 is also rated highly in comparison with fighters of other eras. Although it was developed in the late 1940s and was outdated by the end of the 1950s, the Sabre proved versatile and adaptable, and continued as a front-line fighter in numerous air forces until the last active operational examples were retired by the Bolivian Air Force in 1994.

Its success led to an extended production run of more than 7,800 aircraft between 1949 and 1956, in the United States, Japan and Italy. Variants were built in Canada and Australia. The Canadair Sabre added another 1,815 airframes, and the significantly redesigned CAC Sabre (sometimes known as the Avon Sabre or CAC CA-27), had a production run of 112. It was by far the most-produced Western jet fighter, with total production of all variants at 9,860 units.

 
 
Picture of model:-
 

Corgi aviation archive general information

(note not all this information will apply to the above model)
 

The Corgi Aviation Archive features a vast selection of diecast model airplanes in 1:144, 1:72, 1:48 and 1:32 scales and has become the standard by which all other ranges are judged. Each Corgi model is based on a specific aircraft from an important historical or modern era of flight, and has been authentically detailed from original documents and archival material. Subject aircraft in the Aviation Archive appeal to all aviation enthusiasts and every diecast model airplane includes such features as:

  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.
  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.
  • Interchangeable landing gear with rotating wheels.
  • Poseable presention stand to display the aircraft "in flight".
  • Many limited editions with numbered certificate of authenticity.
  • Detailed pilots and crew members (1:72/1:32).
  • Authentic detachable ordnance loads complete with placards (1:72/1:32).
  • Selected interchangeable features such as airbrakes, opened canopies and access panels (1:72/1:32).
  • Selected moving parts such as gun turrets, control surfaces and swing-wings (1:72/1:32).
 
 
Copyright 2003-2017 Chris Lem Models