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Corgi aviation archive model details

 
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Code

Make

Description

Price

31207 Corgi   Vulcan B2 - 617 Sqn RAF, Camo & Blue Steel (1,200 ONLY) £ 0.00
      Out of stock
     
  Vulcan B2 XL427 was completed in September 1962 before being equipped to carry the Blue Steel standoff nuclear missile and put on strength with 83 Squadron. After several years of operation with 83 Squadron, XL427 was transferred to the Scampton wing and 617 Squadron in 1969. This model represents the aircraft during its first spell with 617 Squadron, the famous 'Dambusters', in 1969, and is depicted carrying a Blue Steel missile and proudly displaying the triple lightning bolts of 617 Squadron's crest on the tailfin. XL427 was to go on to have a somewhat nomadic career, serving variously with 27, 9, 50, 44 and 230 (OCU) Squadrons before finally being delivered to Macrihanish for crash rescue training in 1982. The aircraft lingered on a little longer, finally being removed from the RAF's books as destroyed in 1986, a sad end for such a fine aircraft.
LIMITED EDITION OF ONLY 1,200, sold out at wholesale and expected to to rapidly become a rare and sought after model.

The Avro Vulcan, sometimes referred to as the Hawker Siddeley Vulcan, was a jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. Aircraft manufacturer A V Roe & Co (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the riskiest option. Several scale aircraft, designated Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles.

The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War, a conflict between Britain and Argentina in 1982.

The Vulcan lacked defensive weaponry, initially relying upon high-speed high-altitude flight to evade interception. Electronic countermeasures were employed by the B.1 (designated B.1A) and B.2 from circa 1960. A change to low-level tactics was made in the mid-1960s. In the mid 1970s, nine Vulcans were adapted for maritime radar reconnaissance operations, redesignated as B.2 (MRR). In the final years of service, six Vulcans were converted to the K.2 tanker configuration for aerial refuelling. Since retirement by the RAF one example, B.2 XH558, has been restored for use in display flights and air shows.
 
 
Picture of model:-
 

Corgi aviation archive general information

(note not all this information will apply to the above model)
 

The Corgi Aviation Archive features a vast selection of diecast model airplanes in 1:144, 1:72, 1:48 and 1:32 scales and has become the standard by which all other ranges are judged. Each Corgi model is based on a specific aircraft from an important historical or modern era of flight, and has been authentically detailed from original documents and archival material. Subject aircraft in the Aviation Archive appeal to all aviation enthusiasts and every diecast model airplane includes such features as:

  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.
  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.
  • Interchangeable landing gear with rotating wheels.
  • Poseable presention stand to display the aircraft "in flight".
  • Many limited editions with numbered certificate of authenticity.
  • Detailed pilots and crew members (1:72/1:32).
  • Authentic detachable ordnance loads complete with placards (1:72/1:32).
  • Selected interchangeable features such as airbrakes, opened canopies and access panels (1:72/1:32).
  • Selected moving parts such as gun turrets, control surfaces and swing-wings (1:72/1:32).
 
 
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